D/Generation

Available Platforms: Amiga, DOS

D/Generation is a puzzle/adventure game released by Mindscape in the year 1991 for the PC, Amiga, and Atari ST.

Year1991
GenreAction
Rating4.5

85/100 based on 9 editorial reviews. Add your vote

PublisherMindscape
DeveloperMindscape
OS supportedWin7 64bit, Win8.1, Windows 10, MacOS 10.6+
Updated5 March 2020
TAGSaction-adventure aga amiga cd32 apple 2 original game cyberpunk isometric puzzle-solving single screen

Game Review

D/Generation is a puzzle/adventure game released by Mindscape in the year 1991 for the PC, Amiga, and Atari ST. The game even got a port to the Amiga CD32 in 1993.

Robert Cook initially developed the game for the Apple IIe in 1989 under the name D-Generation. It was supposed to be published by Brøderbund, but this version was never released. Later Cook converted it for PC and Amiga, and the game was finally released in 1991.

So, what is this popular 90s game like? In my eyes its a shooter based arcade game that is built around a puzzle system and for some reason it turned out great!

The story for D/Generation takes on a futuristic/Cyberpunk approach as it is based on the year 2021, where a French organization known as Genoq has broken through science by building a set of genetically engineered bioweapons. Unluckily for them, the weapons have now taken over their Singaporean lab. You, the player, take on a role of a jetpack riding courier who wakes up at sea, lost, utterly oblivious to what's going on. You must deliver a package of crucial importance to Genoq's top researcher Jean-Paul Derrida, who is locked away on the 10th floor in a bioweapon infested research facility.

The game takes on a 3D-isometric view where it has multiple elements of puzzle, adventure, shooting built into an arcade-centered playstyle. Although you are initially unarmed, the game quickly provides you with your most reliable means of defense and offense, a laser gun with infinite gun ammo. This gun will be your partner throughout this mad run as it can do anything from putting holes in your enemies to tripping switches. The game is broken down into floors and rooms that are filled with hostile enemies, including the faculty's self-defense system that has gone haywire.

The bioweapons are Neogen's that come in 4 generations: A, B, C, and D. All 4 of these state of the art killing machines have a unique design and trait to them;

A: A bouncing red ball that will smother you to death with the added ability to go invisible at will.

B: A bouncing blue cylinder that will crush anything in its way.

C: A humanoid that can disguise himself as another. It will take you by surprise and decapitate you even before you know it

D: With only a single prototype created, this is the ultimate weapon. Equipped with ''Neuro-holographic'' camouflaging and a nearly indestructible armor, this thing is the real deal.

All these scientific creations of death will pursue you to give you the fight of your life.

With some neat graphics that imaginatively depict a cyberpunk city, the game never gets visually boring, each room is exceptionally well designed with catchy colors and excellent animations. Sadly it does not have any in-game music, but the atmosphere is great anyway.

Overall, the game is pretty difficult, and the ''save by floor'' feature doesn't help at all, but, it's challengingly entertaining. The mixture of puzzles and arcade shooting makes way for a dynamic gaming experience where you aren't put in a one-dimensional monotonous playstyle. In my eyes, the game is one of the highlights of the early 90s gaming era and is a definite yes by me to anyone who wants to give it a go.

If you want, you can also try the HD version that has been published on Steam.

Review by: Adam
Published: 7 March 2020, 7:10 am


Screenshots

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Download D/Generation - Amiga Version

Amiga AGA version 2.3 - Language: English - Size: 7.90 Mb

Amiga AGA version 1.0 - Language: English - Size: 8.57 Mb


Download D/Generation - DOS Version

DOS version 1.0 - Language: English - Size: 1.69 Mb


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